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dc.contributor.advisorHorning, Ross C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHumeston, Helenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-21T18:51:48Z
dc.date.available2017-08-21T18:51:48Z
dc.date.issued1969en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/114104
dc.description.abstractFrom primitive times until the present era, the historical development of Japan has, in large measure, been determined by the convergence of religion and politics. The earliest rulers of Japan, the chieftains of the Yamato clan, justified their right to rule on the basis of their claim to divine ancestry by tracing their lineage to the legendary Sun Goddess, Agnaterasu Omikami. The theocratic tradition continued from that time, the second or third century, until Emperor Hirohito renounced his divinity following Japan's defeat in World War II.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleNichiren Shoshu Soka Gakkai: The Fusion of Religion and Politics in Contemporary Japanen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorHumeston, Helenen_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineHistory (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Historyen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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