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dc.contributor.authorRigge, William F., S.J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-06T14:49:58Z
dc.date.available2018-11-06T14:49:58Z
dc.date.issued1912-12-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/119914
dc.description.abstractFirst Paragraph: | The National Geographic Magazine devoted nearly the whole of its October 1912 number to the canals and art treasures of China, illustrating them by eighty-five excellent photographs. The canal system is truly wonderful. We Americans are apt to look upon the Panama canal as the greatest engineering feat ever accomplished. We are told by the Scientific American of November 9th, that if the material excavated at Panama had been taken from the United States, it might have made a canal ten feet deep and fifty-five feet wide, and reaching across the continent from Boston to San Francisco. And yet, this Panama canal, large as it is, is a mere pigmy in comparison with the canal system of China, Korea and Japan. If this were transferred to the United States, it would be equal in length to forty canals running from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and sixty from our northern to our southern boundary.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectRigge Papersen_US
dc.subjectThe Realm of Scienceen_US
dc.titleRealm of Science December 20th 1912en_US
dc.title.alternativeThe Chinese Canalsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.volumeIVen_US
dc.title.workThe Creighton Chronicleen_US
dc.description.pages188-190en_US
dc.description.issue3en_US
dc.url.link1https://archive.org/stream/creightonchronic4n3crei#page/184/mode/2up


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