Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRigge, William F., S.J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-12T21:11:54Z
dc.date.available2018-12-12T21:11:54Z
dc.date.issued1915-04-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/120566
dc.description.abstractFirst Paragraph: | That astronomy habitually deals with numbers, distances and quantities that stagger our ordinary imagination, is a fact now quite universally conceded by the general reader. While he is favorably disposed to grant almost everything that astronomy demands, there are some things, however, at which, what he calls his inborn common sense, rebels, and which seem to him impositions upon his credulity. One of these things refers to the constitution of the earth’s interior. When the highest mountains are less than six miles high, and the deepest oceans less than ten miles deep, thus giving us a total range of only sixteen miles out of the four thousand that lie between us and the earth’s centre, it seems the height of rashness and precipitation to pretend to judge upon the constitution of the immense interior and unexplorable regions that must forever remain to us a terra incognita.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectRigge Papersen_US
dc.subjectThe Realm of Scienceen_US
dc.subjectEarthen_US
dc.titleRealm of Science April 20th 1915en_US
dc.title.alternativeThe Earth a Steel Ballen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.volumeVIen_US
dc.title.workThe Creighton Chronicleen_US
dc.description.pages315-320en_US
dc.description.issue7en_US
dc.url.link1https://archive.org/stream/creightonchronic6n7crei#page/n35/mode/2up


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record