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dc.contributor.authorRoundy, Kali
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-17T23:08:51Z
dc.date.available2019-04-17T23:08:51Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/122418
dc.description.abstractIn 2012 at the global Clinton initiative in New York, President Obama announced that more than 20 million people worldwide were victims of human trafficking, including children forced to work in sweatshops and women pushed into the sex trade. President Obama referred to human trafficking as “modern slavery.” Worldwide concern grew on April 14, 2014, when Boko Haram kidnapped 276 girls from a school in Chibok, Nigeria to be used as sex and labor slaves as well as suicide bombers. After the Chibok abduction, it was estimated that over 3,000 women and children were trafficked by Daesh3 to Syria including males for extremist military groups.
dc.description.abstractUNICEF estimates that there are 5.5 million children trafficked each year and while a gendered crime, primarily affecting women and girls, the number of men and boys being trafficked each year increases. The United Nations (UN) office on Drugs and Crime announced that “No country is immune from trafficking in persons.” In fact, Human Trafficking is the world’s fastest growing crime that requires action on a national and international level. In response to this growing concern, the UN General Assembly passed a resolution on December 18th, 2013 designating July 30th as the World Day Against Human Trafficking. Additionally, countries around the world have taken a stance by adopting different approaches to combat human trafficking including the legalization of prostitution. Prostitution laws range from all-inclusive prohibition and criminalization of prostitutes and/or clients to complete legalization. The United States and the Netherlands are prime examples of countries using very different approaches to address human trafficking. This article discusses the approaches used to negate human trafficking by the United States and the Netherlands. Specifically, the article will compare the impact of each of these countries’ prostitution laws on their effect on human trafficking.
dc.description.abstractThis article proceeds in three sections. First, the Background examines the global stance on human trafficking, the legal concept of human trafficking, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA), the United States’ human trafficking tier system, and the primary legal approaches to prostitution. This article then advances to the Argument section, comparing how the United States’ and the Netherland’s prostitution laws have impacted human trafficking. This argument will evaluate which prostitution scheme was more successful against human trafficking and the consequences of each country’s approach.
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.rightsCopyrighten_US
dc.subject.otherSchool of Lawen_US
dc.subject.otherMagazineen_US
dc.titleDid anyone get it "right?" A Comparison of the Netherlands' and the United States' prostitution-schemes on human traffickingen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume10en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton International and Comparative Law Journalen_US
dc.description.pages103-117en_US
dc.date.year2019en_US
dc.date.monthJanuary
dc.description.issue1en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorRoundy, Kali


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