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dc.contributor.authorAmidon, Philip R., S.J.
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Cuthbertus Hamilton
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-23T18:50:54Z
dc.date.available2019-05-23T18:50:54Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/122810
dc.description.abstractIt has seemed opportune to republish this index in a corrected and extended version; there has been added to the list of names a list of selected words, and the method of referring to the text has been somewhat altered.|The exact scope of C.H. Turner’s masterpiece is not immediately apparent from its title or subtitles (Canonum et conciliorum graecorum interpretationes latinae; Canones et concilia graeca ab antiquis interpretibus latine reddita). What one in fact finds here is an edition of the earliest surviving collections of church canons in Latin which are undoubtedly from the fourth century or have been assigned to it by at least some consensus of scholarship; some of them are translations from Greek, while others were originally drafted in Latin itself. Most of them, with the exception of the Apostolic Constitutions and Canons, are attributed to church councils.|Turner, however, also offers a selection of doctrinal and historical material of enormous value, some of it indeed connected to the councils whose canons he edits; a comparison, for instance, of the creed contained in the synodical letter of the Council of Sardica with the Tomus Damasi, will suggest how far the doctrinal education of the western church advanced during the course of the fourth century. The connection of other historical matter to the canons is less obvious, however; one wonders what the Athanasian Historia acephala is doing here (granted that it is part of the collection of Theodosius the Deacon), however grateful one is to have the edition.|There are two difficulties in the way to making an index to Ecclesiae Occidentalis Monumenta Iuris Antiquissima (EOMIA). One is the difference between the general plan of the work on the one hand, and the chronological sequence in which its several instalments were published on the other (the editor explains why in tomus 2, p. xi). EOMIA is in two tomi, the first of which is divided into fasciculi, and those further into partes; the second tomus is divided immediately into partes. The pagination throughout each tomus is consecutive, but the chronological order of publication of the different instalments within each one does not always correspond to the general plan; thus, for instance, the instalment which was the last to be published actually has its place, according to the editor’s general plan, in the middle of the first tomus. Those libraries which waited out the forty years between the appearance of the first instalment and that of the last, could finally bind the two tomi as two volumes, according to the editor's original plan and the order of pagination, but, alas, some of them simply bound the instalments into a certain number of volumes in the chronological order in which they were received. The resulting disarrangement can easily be imagined.|The second difficulty is the variety of arrangements of the material within the several pages. Sometimes the line numeration is consecutive throughout the whole page, whether the page is divided into columns or not. At other times each column has its own line numeration, when the page is divided into columns. Pages, for that matter, are sometimes quartered. Then again, the material is at times grouped into shorter subsections within the page or column, each subsection being numbered separately with Arabic, Roman, or even Greek numerals, and line numeration being consecutive only within each of the several paragraphs. |This being the case, the only course seems to be to follow the original plan of EOMIA in compiling the indices (the editor's death left the work without any general indices); the readers will have to find out for themselves whether their libraries have bound the several instalments according to this plan. The first number stands for the tomus (the tomus number is not repeated for successive entries within the same tomus) and the second for the page. This is followed, when necessary, by the letter a or b in parentheses to indicate the left-hand or right-hand column respectively. The next number or numbers represent(s) the line, or the section and line, depending on the arrangement of the text. Thus e.g., 1.158.(b).66 means tomus 1, page 158, right-hand column, line 66| 1.70–1.154; 98.154: tomus 1, pages 70–71, line 154, and page 98, line 154| 1.664.3.8, 11, 14, 21: tomus 1, page 664, section 3, lines 8, 11, 14, and 21| 2.410.(b).II.5: tomus 2, page 410, right-hand column, section II, line 5||Between pp. 32 and 33 in tomus 1 the editor inserted some additional pages, numbered 32 a, 32 b, 32 c...32 z, then 32 aa, 32 bb, etc. He did likewise between pp. 440 and 441 in the same tomus; 440 is followed by 440 a, 440 b, etc.|The index is to the material within the edited text only, and not to the editor's own notes. Only rarely is editorial comment introduced, and then within square brackets (used for information not supplied or implied by the text, except when placed around numbers, when they reproduce the editor's own usage). The index aims to indicate what is in the edited text; it does not vouch for its accuracy.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.subjectCouncils and synods -- indexen_US
dc.subjectCanon law -- indexen_US
dc.subjectChurch history -- indexen_US
dc.subjectEcclesiastical law -- indexen_US
dc.titleIndex of Names and Selected Words in "Ecclesiae Occidentalis Monumenta Iuris Antiquissima"en_US
dc.title.alternativeIndex of Names and Selected Words in ECCLESIAE OCCIDENTALIS MONUMENTA IURIS ANTIQUISSIMA / ed. C.H. Turner (Oxford, 1899-1939)en_US
dc.typeOther Typeen_US


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