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dc.contributor.advisorIverson, Lindsay
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Heidi
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-17T19:36:30Z
dc.date.available2021-05-16T08:40:27Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/126583
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this quality improvement project is to administer the Palliative Care Knowledge Scale (PaCKS) before and after implementing a 4-minute educational video about palliative care.|Background: Continued evidence demonstrates that palliative care repeatedly reduces pain, improves symptom control, and reduces the cost of healthcare. Unfortunately, most patients are referred to palliative services too late, many within 1-2 months of death, some not at all. Patients are often misinformed or uninformed about palliative care and the services that it can provide, often delaying or restricting their participation.|Sample/Setting: Data was collected from a single outpatient oncology office in the Midwest. A sample population was obtained through a convenience sampling technique of 79 patients over an 8-week period.|Methods: The Palliative Care Knowledge Scale (PaCKS) was chosen to assess patient’s baseline knowledge of palliative care. If willing to participate, patient’s sign a consent and take a pre-survey (PaCKS). Once done they watch a 4-minute video about palliative care. After watching the video, the patient will take a post-survey (PaCKS).|Results: On average, participants scored about a half point higher on the post-survey (M = 12.51, SE = .12), than they did on the pre-survey (M = 12.05, SE = .2). This difference, .46, 95% CI [-.03, .95] was non-significant t(77) = 1.89, p = .06, and reflects a relatively small effect size, d = 0.21. When asked if patients would have a desire to participate in a palliative care program and if they felt that palliative care was important, 75% and 83% of ‘unsure’ participants changed to ‘yes’ which seems potentially valuable.|Conclusion: Although the video did not significantly increase patient’s knowledge of palliative care, it could potentially increase a patient’s desire to participate in a palliative care program and their perception that palliative care is importanten_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshPalliative Careen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasmsen_US
dc.subject.meshMultimediaen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Education as Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen_US
dc.titleEffects of Palliative Care Video Implementation on Outpatient Cancer Patient’s Knowledge and Perception of Palliative Careen_US
dc.typeManuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderSmith, Heidi
dc.embargo.terms2021-05-16
dc.degree.levelDNPen_US
dc.degree.disciplineDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Programen_US
dc.degree.nameDoctor of Nursing Practiceen_US
dc.degree.committeeGeiger, Danielle


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