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dc.contributor.authorRuffinengo, Marcen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-11T00:17:31Z
dc.date.available2021-02-11T00:17:31Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.issn1522-5658en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/129191
dc.description.abstractAbiogenesis is the proposed process through which inanimate matter eventually led to life on earth. As a research area, the issue is certainly loaded with fodder for debate and philosophical and ideological disagreement about what life is and how it came to be. Dealing with the origin of life (OoL) obviously has the potential to tread into spiritual and religious grounds for both scientists interested in this area but also for the public at large when any debate about “where did we come from?” arises. However, it is not just the general public that struggles with balancing religious and spiritual explanations for how people came into being with scientific evidence. As we will show, there is a lively debate among OoL researchers about a similar set of scientific facts pointing to the intervention of a transcendent designer or such an idea being incompatible with science generally. Furthermore, we note that much of this debate is centered around the concepts of ontological and methodological materialism. While we make no claims about resolving or contributing meaningfully to the debate it is worth pointing out, especially to outside observers, that such a debate is in fact alive and well among OoL researchers. Thus, it is certainly possible for OoL researchers to view abiogenesis as an atheistic endeavor and many do. However, atheism is not a requirement to believe that abiogenesis played a role in the OoL as many scientists view such discoveries as a “mark of the Creator” as opposed to merely an idea that life must have come from inanimate matter.|Keywords: ideology, abiogenesis, atheism, theism, thermodynamicsen_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.titleIdeology in Biology: Theism Meets Atheism in the Case of Abiogenesisen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume23en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workJournal of Religion & Societyen_US


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