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dc.contributor.authorKober, Karilyn E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T02:41:49Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T02:41:49Z
dc.date.issued1979en_US
dc.identifier.citation12 Creighton L. Rev. 1081 (1978-1979)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39120
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|The generally recognized rule is that an unestablished business cannot recover in a suit for lost profits. The rationale behind the "new business rule" was that the absence of income and experience renders proof of anticipated profits too speculative to meet the evidentiary standard of reasonable certainty when a new business is involved. The new business rule has been criticized, however, by those courts which have recognized that strict adherence to the rule could result in the denial of recovery despite the availability of sufficient evidence for determining probable losses. Thus, in recent years an increasing number of courts have been willing to allow recovery of lost profits of a new business if damages are shown with reasonable certainty...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleCase for Recovery: Damages for Lost Profits of an Unestablished Business, Aen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume12en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1978-1979en_US
dc.description.pages1081en_US


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