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dc.contributor.authorTroia, Virginia K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T03:12:41Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T03:12:41Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.identifier.citation14 Creighton L. Rev. 1123 (1980-1981)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39290
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|In United States v. Roberts the Eighth Circuit concluded that private individuals, when they effectively barred the defendant from retrieving possession of his property, had completed a search and seizure of defendant's property without any governmental involvement and that a subsequent police seizure was not protected by the fourth amendment. As the following discussion will show, this decision is a departure from Supreme Court decisions which have defined the scope of the fourth amendment in terms of an individual's legitimate expectation of privacy in the items searched or seized. This article will explore the issues involved in determining when governmental participation is sufficient to trigger the application of the fourth amendment and when such governmental action constitutes a search and seizure within the meaning of the fourth amendment. These issues will be discussed with respect to the impact which recent case law has had in redefining the scope of the fourth amendment...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleCriminal Procedure/Search and Seizureen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume14
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.pages1123en_US
dc.time.yr1980-1981


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