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dc.contributor.authorWolven, Melanee L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T23:01:19Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T23:01:19Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citation25 Creighton L. Rev. 1461 (1991-1992)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39959
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Psychotherapists owe a duty to protect endangered third persons from unreasonable risk of harm posed by potentially dangerous patients. This duty to protect includes the duty to take several precautionary measures. Two important measures pertain to the duty to warn and the duty to confine. Both of these duties raise serious ethical considerations. A warning to endangered third persons may breach psychotherapist-patient confidentiality; confinement may cause deprivation of personal liberty. Often, psychotherapists must balance the interest of the public against the patient's interest in confidentiality and effective treatment. Not surprisingly, psychotherapists seek legal advice from the American Psychiatric Association most often on the issue of the "duty to protect," which includes both the duty to warn and the duty to confine...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titlePsychotherapist's Duty to Protect, Aen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume25en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1991-1992en_US
dc.description.pages1461en_US


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