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dc.contributor.authorBowen, Veronica L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T16:25:58Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T16:25:58Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citation27 Creighton L. Rev. 605 (1993-1994)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40045
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Prior to the formation of the political entity we know as the United States, the aboriginal Indian tribes inhabiting this continent were considered to be "self-governing, sovereign, political communities." When the colonies formed a union of states, the Indian tribes ceded some of their land to the new country and came under the protection of the United States, but the tribes survived as distinct entities. As "domestic dependent nations," the tribes became unique aggregations in our country, possessing some of their original sovereign powers, but nonetheless subordinate to the Federal Government. Much of Indian law is concerned with defining what attributes of Indian sovereignty have survived following the creation of the United States...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleExtent of Indian Regulatory Authority over Non-Indians: South Dakota v. Bourlanden_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume27en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1993-1994en_US
dc.description.pages605en_US


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