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dc.contributor.authorSedlacek, Ronald J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHallstrom, Robert J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T18:44:17Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T18:44:17Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citation30 Creighton L. Rev. 725 (1996-1997)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40189
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|As typical of any other state, the evolving structure of the banking industry in Nebraska regularly attracts center stage attention of bankers and state lawmakers alike. The structure of banking organizations within Nebraska has been the subject of numerous legislative proposals, hearings, studies and debates. In theory, when considering the respective interests of bank management, bank investors and bank customers, and reconciling such interests with concerns that may be expressed by the public at large, the ideal banking structure should ensure safety and soundness, stability and profitability. More specifically from a state legislative viewpoint, the ideal structure should offer banks the opportunity to operate efficiently and competitively, to promote "the public necessity, convenience, and advantage," and to meet the needs of its customers. In reality, there have been sharp disagreements within the industry and among lawmakers as to what type of banking structure would best achieve such theoretical objectives. As a result, bank structure laws may best be described in terms of the ongoing processes of design and construct, accommodation and compromise...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleBank Structure in Nebraskaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume30en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1996-1997en_US
dc.description.pages725en_US


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