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dc.contributor.authorKelderman, Eric D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T20:25:47Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T20:25:47Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citation33 Creighton L. Rev. 359 (1999-2000)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40338
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Before 1996, no statutorily prescribed statute of limitations was in effect in regard to the filing of habeas corpus petitions in federal courts. Since no statutory limitation period existed, there was no reason to determine the exact moment that filing occurred. Pro se litigants, therefore, did not need to have special rules in effect for their benefit because they suffered no disadvantage due to their status as pro se inmates. However, on April 24, 1996, Congress enacted the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act ("AEDPA"), which amended 28 U.S.C. Section, Section 2244, 2254, and 2255. The AEDPA places a one-year statute of limitations on the filing of petitions for writ of habeas corpus and the filing of motions attacking sentence under the statute's purview. The one-year statute of limitations, under the AEDPA, begins to run at the latest of four...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleFairness in Habeas Petition Filings for Pro Se Prisoners: The Propriety of the Eighth Circuit's Holding in Nichols v. Bowersoxen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume33en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1999-2000en_US


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