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dc.contributor.authorNeustadter, Garyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-18T16:14:33Z
dc.date.available2013-02-18T16:14:33Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citation39 Creighton L. Rev. 225 (2005-2006)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40556
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Congress has concluded that the voyage of consumer bankruptcy in the United States is off course and that some of its crew - consumer bankruptcy attorneys and bankruptcy judges - no longer can be completely trusted at the helm. Following years of drama reminiscent of the 1914 silent film serial "Perils of Pauline," we now have a midcourse correction: the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 ("the Act"). Save perhaps the 1938 introduction of Chapter XIII, the correction presents the most far reaching changes in consumer bankruptcy law since the adoption of the Bankruptcy Act of 1898. These changes come little more than a decade after Congress established a National Bankruptcy Review Commission (the second such commission in twenty-five years) to review, improve, and update the Bankruptcy Code "in ways which do not disturb the fundamental tenets and balance of current law." A House Report accompanying the legislation that established the second Commission pronounced Congress "generally satisfied with the basic framework established in the current Bankruptcy Code."...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.title2006: A Consumer Bankruptcy Odysseyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume39en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note2005-2006en_US
dc.description.pages225en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorFiroz, Muhammaden_US


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