Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFeeney, Floyden_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-18T16:37:49Z
dc.date.available2013-02-18T16:37:49Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citation41 Creighton L. Rev. 37 (2008)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40602
dc.description.abstractFIRST PARAGRAPH(S)|California is one of eighteen American states that authorize the recall of statewide officers, and one of the approximately thirty-six states that authorize the recall of local elected officials. Although a few states purport to authorize the recall of members of Congress, the U.S. Constitution appears to preclude this, and California law does not authorize such recalls. No state purports to authorize recall of the President.|As the name suggests, "recall" is a way to remove an elected official before the end of the official's normal term in office. In this respect, "recall" is similar to impeachment. In other respects, however, recall differs radically from impeachment. Recall is a direct democracy device-initiated by signatures from individual citizens and resolved by a vote of the people. Impeachment, by contrast, is a legislative procedure-triggered in California, as under the U.S. Constitution, by a vote of the lower house and resolved by a vote of the upper house...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.title2003 California Gubernatorial Recall, Theen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume41en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note2008en_US
dc.description.pages37en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record