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dc.contributor.advisorTracy, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorKreifels, Erinen_US
dc.contributor.authorTracy, Maryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-03T19:09:34Z
dc.date.available2015-05-17T08:40:13Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/49973
dc.description.abstractBackground: Heart failure has been identified as a diagnosis associated with significant morbidity and mortality with inconsistent outcomes. As of October 1st, 2012 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began reducing payments to penalize hospitals for excessive heart failure readmissions and publicly reporting readmission rates. The rationale for the reduction in payments is that many heart failure related admissions could have been prevented through improved outpatient management. In 2013, Medicare reimbursement cuts were applied to critical access hospitals. This most recent decrease in reimbursement to critical access hospitals paired with lack of reimbursement for heart failure related 30-day hospital readmissions provided the basis for implementing a heart failure management program.|Participants: Thirteen adult patients, over the age of 19, voluntarily participated in the heart failure management program in a rural primary care clinic located in the Midwest.|Methods: The project was a quality improvement design. A chronic heart failure management program was implemented utilizing the American Heart Association and the Institute for Health Care Improvement guidelines for heart failure management. Educational resources with monitoring logs for weights and symptoms were provided to each patient at the initial visit. Nursing staff filled out a heart failure flow sheet at each heart failure related visit, and each patient who presented was then contacted one month from his/her initial visit date to discuss patient concerns.|Results: Of the 13 individuals who presented for the initial visit, 11 had the flow record completed. One patient came in for subsequent visits due to changes in medications and follow-up. The flow record was filled out entirely on these 2 subsequent visits. There were two heart failure admissions during the 12-week implementation period and neither were readmissions. Both patients followed up within one week of hospital discharge. There were no heart failure readmissions during the 12-week implementation period.|Discussion: The findings of this project support the long-term feasibility of a chronic heart failure management program.|Key words: heart failure, chronic heart failure management, heart failure management programs, heart failure management in primary care.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseasesen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Failureen_US
dc.subject.meshRural Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality Improvementen_US
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Careen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Characteristicsen_US
dc.titleChronic Heart Failure Management in Rural Primary Careen_US
dc.typeManuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderErin Kreifels, RN, BSNen_US
dc.description.noteManuscripten_US
dc.embargo.terms2015-05-17
dc.degree.levelDNPen_US
dc.degree.disciplineDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Programen_US
dc.degree.nameDoctor of Nursing Practiceen_US
dc.degree.committeeWoods, Sandraen_US
dc.degree.committeeBrinkman, Debbieen_US


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