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dc.contributor.authorter Kuile, Janineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T18:02:38Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T18:02:38Z
dc.date.issued2008-05-23en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 345en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/50423
dc.description.abstractOriginally, in Deuteronomy, Moses permitted a man to divorce his wife based on some "uncleanness", in order to protect the woman's rights. In Jesus' day, the stricter and more popular view of divorce taught that a man could do so for any reason, even if he found another woman to be more beautiful. Was the climate then, very much different from that of ours now?||In today's gospel, rather than debate the issue of indecency, Jesus addresses the hardness of people's hearts. He explains that unless we invite God into our marriage, we marry for all the wrong reasons. God emptied Himself and His Spirit to us so utterly; we find it hard to comprehend. Should Love in any personal relationship call for anything less? The capacity to do so, results from a call to a close relationship with Jesus in the Spirit.|In dark contrast, the majority of today's marriages in our imperfect world end in divorce. I witness this daily when divorced or separated parents call, seeking help to keep their kids at our institution. As much as I try to console them, I know there is nothing I can say to ease their pain. Divorce causes God deep sorrow. In our Church, the issue of divorced and civilly remarried Catholics is a painful pastoral problem.|Yet St. Paul felt the preservation of peace is a greater value than the preservation of an unpeaceful marriage. How many of us, from personal experience or know of someone, who spent more than half of their adult life working dutifully on their marriage only to watch it crash and burn. As sorrowful as that can be, it is also hopeful when people can move on to a place of diminished pain and hope for new life.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/65104
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Friday, May 23, 2008: 7th week in Ordinary Time.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day23en_US
dc.date.year2008en_US
dc.date.monthMayen_US
dc.program.unitVP for Student Servicesen_US
dc.program.unitFinancial Aiden_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorter Kuile, Janineen_US
dc.date.daynameFridayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 7en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/50437
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/50409
dc.subject.local1James 5:9-12en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 103:1-2, 3-4, 8-9, 11-12en_US
dc.subject.local4Mark 10:1-12en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear IIen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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