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dc.contributor.authorO'Keefe, Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T18:14:39Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T18:14:39Z
dc.date.issued2004-01-03en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 206en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/51021
dc.description.abstractOn of the things that many people in the Christian community find most difficult is accepting God's love for them. We tend to have a fairly well-developed sense of our own failure and it is easy to read the opening lines of the first reading with a sense of dread. To declare that "everyone who acts in righteousness is begotten by him" seems to presume that anyone who does not so act is not begotten by God. We many find our selves continually engaged in a frenzied effort to fix our faults.|Now, I would never say that such an effort is not worth while. The Christian life does, in fact, require that we try to improve and grow spiritually and morally. Yet, at a recent faith sharing meeting, a good friend of mine reflected that this improvement and growth is possible precisely because God loves us; it does not make God love us. The possibility of growth toward righteousness depends upon God first loving us. This, it seems to me is what the second verse of the first reading is all about-"See what love the Father has bestowed on us that we may be called the children of God."|I also suspect that this is why the framers of the lectionary paired this reading with John the Baptist's declaration that Jesus is "the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world." It is so easy to rattle off the Christian proclamation that Jesus died for our sins, but it is quite another to recognize what this means for us personally. At the very least, it means what the author of 1 John understood: God is working in us for our transformation. "What we shall be has not yet been revealed." No wonder the psalmist invites us to sing a new song to the Lord.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Saturday, January 3, 2004: 2nd week in Christmas.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day3en_US
dc.date.year2004en_US
dc.date.monthJanuaryen_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitTheologyen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorO'Keefe IV, John J.en_US
dc.date.daynameSaturdayen_US
dc.date.seasonChristmasen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 2en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/51035
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/51009
dc.subject.local11 John 2:29-3:6en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 98:1, 3cd-4, 5-6en_US
dc.subject.local4John 1:29-34en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear IIen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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