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dc.contributor.authorWirth, Eileenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T19:40:35Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T19:40:35Z
dc.date.issued2010-09-17en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 447en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/53476
dc.description.abstract"But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep." Corinthians||This has been a day of "door knocking" although I work with an open door. People rap to alert me to their presence then stick their heads around the door. It has been a happy day of reuniting with students back from vacation, directing lost freshmen and plowing through a myriad of year-opening details.|But I miss a knock that will never come again. I keep halfway expecting to hear my friend Ashton Welch's lilting Barbados accent asking to come in, a big smile on his face, catching up on the summer. In the words of St. Paul, Dr. Welch of our History Department, one of our most loved and respected professors, has "fallen asleep." His recent sudden death has left a huge void.|In these circumstances, meditating on St. Paul's unflinching demand that we accept the resurrection as a sine non qua of being Christians is both comforting and challenging. St. Paul is almost scary in bluntly asserting that if Christ has not been raised then "empty too is our preaching; empty, too, your faith. " And he gets tougher. "For if the dead are not raised, neither has Christ been raised, and if Christ has not been raised, your faith is in vain." In short, if we can only accept Christ as an ethical preacher and reject the resurrection, our faith is empty.|We can accept the idea that at some time and in some form there will be a resurrection and leave the details to God. Then we can take comfort in the last two lines of this passage. "But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep." We can trust that our loved ones live on in some form. Ultimately it's in the hands of a God who loves them and us.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/65014
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Friday, September 17, 2010: 24th week in Ordinary Time.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day17en_US
dc.date.year2010en_US
dc.date.monthSeptemberen_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitJournalism, Media and Computingen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorWirth, Eileen M.en_US
dc.date.daynameFridayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 24en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/53491
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/53460
dc.subject.local11 Corinthians 15:12-20en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 17:1bcd, 6-7, 8b, 15en_US
dc.subject.local4Luke 8:1-3en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear IIen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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