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dc.contributor.authorO'Keefe, Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T19:52:17Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T19:52:17Z
dc.date.issued2004-10-16en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 472en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/54209
dc.description.abstractOddly enough, when I read today's texts I find myself thinking of an old song by the 70's band Pink Floyd. In it, the lead singer chants, "I have become comfortably numb." I don't really remember what the song is about, but it is the image of comfortable numbness that has stayed with me over the years. This reaction to today's readings is not easy to explain, but it seems to have something to do with the juxtaposition of the passage from Ephesians with Jesus' warning in Luke that sins against the spirit cannot be forgiven. I do not presume to offer a definitive interpretation of the meaning of "sin against the spirit," but comfortable numbness seems to me to be a viable candidate.|We live in a culture that specializes in numbness. We have much, but feel we have little. We are surrounded by stimulation, but are easily bored. We lack passion, but we are comfortable. In such a state the words of Paul in the reading from the Ephesians seem to reach our ears as if they were crossing a great distance. We hear them barely, but our attention is elsewhere. We are shopping, we are investing, we are self-absorbed. Paul, in prison, is shouting about the glories of Jesus, about his marvelous deeds, and about his great victory, and we yawn. We mumble the response "you have given your Son rule over the works of your hands," but we don't really care that God has done this. We have become comfortably numb. |The spirit has a hard time working in a heart that has no desire. |My spiritual director tells me that the cure for numbness is gratitude. It may be that it is also the best way to avoid blaspheming the Holy Spirit. Let us pray to be grateful, but beware. Such prayer tends to disturb our comfort.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Saturday, October 16, 2004: 28th week in Ordinary Time.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day16en_US
dc.date.year2004en_US
dc.date.monthOctoberen_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitTheologyen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorO'Keefe IV, John J.en_US
dc.date.daynameSaturdayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 28en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/54222
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/54196
dc.subject.local1Ephesians 1:15-23en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 8:2-3ab, 4-5, 6-7en_US
dc.subject.local4Luke 12:8-12en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear IIen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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