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dc.contributor.advisorRubarth, Lori B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWallin, Stacyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaas Rubarth, Lorien_US
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Carlaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBibow, Valerieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-30T20:17:39Z
dc.date.available2015-05-17T08:40:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/62583
dc.description.abstractThe field of neonatology lacks adequate research to support or oppose the use of umbilical arterial catheters (UACs) for the administration of most fluids, medications, and blood products. There are recognized risks of having a UAC in place. However, it is unknown whether or not these risks increase with specific infusions. The purpose of this research was to identify and explain any relationships between adverse events and the infusion of fluids, medications, and blood products through UACs. The data collection process included a retrospective chart review of 104 infants in a 12-bed level two neonatal intensive care unit who had a UAC placed. Medical records were examined for the number of indwelling catheter days, the size and position of the catheter, the composition and rate of infusates, and any complications possibly related to UAC use. Researchers examined the significance of any associations between adverse events and infusates and evaluated those relationships for practical significance. Relationships that could not be attributed to additional factors included: packed red blood cell transfusions and secondary port occlusion (p= .0259), furosemide and hypertension (p= .0108), and caffeine and hypertension (p= .0367). Further investigation into the safety of specific infusates is warranted. However, based on the results of this study the authors concluded that adverse outcomes are often not the result of infusions through the line as much as the presence of the UAC itself, and it may not be necessary to completely avoid UAC infusions. In fact, decreasing the pain and risks associated with obtaining additional intravascular access and preserving peripheral vessels for later use may improve neonatal outcomes.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshUmbilical Arteriesen_US
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units, Neonatalen_US
dc.subject.meshInfusions, Intra-Arterialen_US
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Adverse Events and the Administration of Fluids, Medications, and Blood Products Through an Umbilical Arterial Catheter in Neonatesen_US
dc.title.alternativeAdverse Events and Umbilical Artery Infusionsen_US
dc.typeManuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderStacy Wallinen_US
dc.description.noteManuscripten_US
dc.embargo.terms2015-05-17
dc.degree.levelDNPen_US
dc.degree.disciplineDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Programen_US
dc.degree.nameDoctor of Nursing Practiceen_US
dc.degree.committeeChristensen, Carlaen_US
dc.degree.committeeBibow, Valerieen_US


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