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dc.contributor.advisorTodd, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKojima, Rinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Vincent J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPearl, Ann C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Julie E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-23T18:59:26Z
dc.date.available2016-05-16T08:40:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/70498
dc.description.abstractIn the United States, hypertension has far reaching effects on mortality, healthcare outcomes, and economics; contributing to at least 1,000 deaths per day and accounting for $47.5 billion in healthcare costs each year (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2014). While this disease impacts a large number of people, its effects are felt the greatest by vulnerable populations who are likely to be uninsured and of low socioeconomic status. These patients have an increased risk of developing hypertension but are less likely to have adequate diagnosis, treatment, and control of their hypertension. Many seek care at "safety net" clinics, which provide care for little to no cost. One such clinic in Omaha, Nebraska is the Heart Ministry Center, which will provide services of some type to over 67,000 disadvantaged people including free medical services, food, clothing, and financial assistance. While the healthcare services that are provided are free of charge, it is imperative that the quality is uncompromised. Compounding the issues already present in treating hypertension with limited resources, in the last year the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC-8) released new evidence based guidelines for the management of hypertension. In order to maintain quality care and increase adherence to the new JNC-8 guidelines, this project consisted of the development and implementation of a hypertension management tool to serve as a framework for the clinic staff in the provision of treatment consistent with current evidence based guidelines. The tool gives providers the ability to quickly identify patient risk factors and develop individualized patient treatment plans in accordance with the JNC-8 guidelines. Consistent provider use of the hypertension management tool improves provider adherence, standardizes hypertension management, and offers ease of tracking hypertension in the vulnerable population that presents to this clinic.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshHypertensionen_US
dc.subject.meshSafety-net Providersen_US
dc.titleDevelopment and Implementation of a Hypertension Management Tool for a Safety Net Clinicen_US
dc.typeManuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderMartha Todden_US
dc.description.noteManuscripten_US
dc.program.unitSchool of Nursing (1971 - July 2013)en_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Nursingen_US
dc.embargo.terms2016-05-16
dc.embargo.terms2016-05-16
dc.degree.levelMSNen_US
dc.degree.disciplineMaster of Science in Nursing (MSN) Degree Programen_US
dc.degree.nameMaster of Science in Nursingen_US


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