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dc.contributor.authorAdu, Omotayoen_US
dc.contributor.authorIdewu, Olawaleen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Barbara Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Warren Sen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorBarbour, Margareten_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T16:08:04Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T16:08:04Z
dc.date.issued1961en_US
dc.identifier.other1900 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/77466
dc.description.abstractThirty-seven Yoruba tales, including fourteen labelled Moral Fables (35-54). The notes on this section (89-98) comment in careful fashion on possible transmission routes, including those of the several Aesopic fables presented. As to these, TH adds the tortoise's deliberation before he accepts the original challenge. The Tortoise and the Boar and The Tortoise and the Snake work off of the Aesopic FS pattern, but use stepping on one's tail as provocation and adding a rope to one's tail as revenge; the moral is that man teaches man to be tall or short. How can the crow in FC speak with the cheese in his mouth? TMCM cuts out the country visit. The non-Aesopic fables are heavier on lessons and more like folk-tales, with emphasis on significant names, magical tests, and strange powers. The Test is ingenious. The Man, the Dove, and the Hawk is a well-crafted lesson in self reliance. The Lion and the Goat follows a familiar pattern but gives the man a rare chance to be the clever judge that recreates the original scene. The Lion, the Tortoise, and the Boar has a good moral: To state one's dislike is to initiate one's annoyance. I feel for the tortoise in the first fable who has collected all the world's wisdom into a gourd but is not smart enough to hoist it on his back while he climbs a tree! The Aesopic story about the bat changing sides and being outcast is told as a pourquoi story on 26. The Tortoise and the Tug of War (59) is told unusually cleverly: the tortoise has dragged both elephant and hippo out of their elements!en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityAs told by Olawale Idewu and Omotayo Adu. Told to and edited by Barbara K. and Warren S. Walkeren_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRutgers University Pressen_US
dc.subject.lccGR351.3.N53 1961en_US
dc.titleNigerian Folk Talesen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.locationNew Brunswick, N.J.en_US
dc.publisher.locationNew Brunswick, NYen_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991004863219702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationAdams, Washington, D.C.en_US
dc.cost.usCost: $9.00en_US
dc.date.acquired1992-05en_US
dc.date.printed1961en_US
dc.description.bindingThis is a hardbound book (hard cover)en_US
dc.description.coverThis book has a dust jacket (book cover)en_US
dc.description.note3First edition?en_US
dc.subject.local1Nigerianen_US
dc.subject.local4Title Page Scanneden_US
dc.time.yr1961


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