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dc.contributor.authorSaroyan, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorChappell, Warrenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T19:02:30Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T19:02:30Z
dc.date.issued1941en_US
dc.identifier.other4044 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/79383
dc.description.abstractTwenty-seven good stories of various genres on eighty-nine pages with clever initials. A note before the first story identifies them as old Armenian stories, including some remembered in Fresno. A particular pleasure lies in the elongated titles of the tales. Here is an example: The Tribulations of he Simple Husband Who Wanted Nothing More than to Eat Goose but was Denied this Delight by His Unfaithful Wife and Her Arrogant but Probably Handsome Lover (17). Fables show up here in various ways. Sometimes a traditional fable shows up in slightly changed form. Thus TB (5) has a form of the La Fontaine version. In this form one of the two hunters has already sold a bearskin, while the other will wait to catch a bear first. The former, foolish hunter, encounters a bear, drops his gun, and falls to the ground pretending to be dead. This bear waters in his face before walking away! Asked what the bear has told him, the foolish hunter becomes less foolish and answers that the bear told him not to sell his skin before he gets it off the bear's body. The traditional fable about the traveler and satyr shows up here as the story of a man and a bear who were friends (7). New to me but like many fables is the story of the turtle who comes to the dying lion shot by hunters. The turtle curses those who come to injure magnificent creatures of the earth like us (8). Similarly, the rabbit tries to imitate the roaring lion, but only makes a squeak that alerts the fox to his presence. The fox comes and kills him easily (44). I do not think there is a bad story in the book. Maybe the best non-fable tells the story of the exchange between a crazy man and a king (64). The best joke might be that about the man who plays a cello with only one string and fingers the string in the same place. In response to his wife's observation that others play with four strings and move their fingers continuously, the man says that they are looking for the place and he has found it (76). There are larger illustrations on 19, 33, 47, 69, and 83.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityBy William Saroyanen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHarcourt, Brace and Company, Incen_US
dc.subject.lccPS3537.A826 F3 1941en_US
dc.titleSaroyan's Fablesen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.location[New York]en_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991003663119702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationSecond Story Books, Bethesda, MDen_US
dc.cost.usCost: $40.00en_US
dc.date.acquired1997-04en_US
dc.date.printed1941en_US
dc.description.bindingThis is a hardbound book (hard cover)en_US
dc.description.note3Signed by Saroyan. #719 of 1000. First edition. Boxeden_US
dc.printer.locationUSAen_US
dc.subject.local1William Saroyanen_US
dc.subject.local4Title Page Scanneden_US
dc.time.yr1941


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