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dc.contributor.authorGaiotto, Luciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGaiotto, Osvaldoen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorDuran, Magdelenaen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorIllustrata da Magdalena Duranen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T19:37:52Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T19:37:52Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780898003352en_US
dc.identifier.other5346 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/80890
dc.description.abstractAs in Duran's other illustrated work in this series, The King Who Understood Animals: A Jataka Tale, the art is characterized by the almond-shaped eyes of human beings. Two sons of a Benares professor are suddenly left orphans. They travel to the Ganges and build two huts, the older son's at a greater distance from the riverbank, the younger's right on the bank. A naja, king of serpents, happens to have a palace deep in the river at this point. One day he passes near the younger son's hut and conceives the idea of becoming his friend. He transforms himself into a young man of his age. He asks the younger son Why do you choose to live so isolated? They converse for some time. In the course of days, they become good friends. Hoping that familiarity will have taken away any fear, the naja decides at last to reveal himself in his true form. The boy tries to hide his fear, but it still keeps him from either sleeping or eating. He goes to his older brother and tells him everything. The older brother learns that his brother wants to be rid of the frightening friend, and he advises him to ask for the jewel on his forehead and to keep asking for three days. The jewel after all is the source of his beauty, power, and magic. When the request is repeated for three days, the naja says to himself that the boy is interested not in him but in his jewel, and so he returns to his palace. He no longer visits the boy. The boy becomes lonely and emaciated, and his brother now counsels him to learn to love the naja for himself and not for his jewel. Only then will he part with the jewel. The boy calls the naja and sees pure love in his eyes. The naja drops the jewel at the boy's feet. At the end of the day, the boy gives it back to him. Their love has its own magical power.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityTradotta dall'inglese da Osvaldo e Lucia Gaiotto e Carla Piccininien_US
dc.languageitaen_US
dc.publisherDharma Publishingen_US
dc.subject.lccBQ1462.I8 J48 2002en_US
dc.titleIl Gioiello dell' Amicizia: Una storia di Jatakaen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.locationBerkeley, Calif.en_US
dc.description.noteLanguage note: Italianen_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991005247369702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationFrom the publisheren_US
dc.cost.usCost: $6.36en_US
dc.date.acquired2004-12en_US
dc.date.printed2002en_US
dc.description.note2Original language: engen_US
dc.printer.locationUSAen_US
dc.subject.local1Jatakasen_US
dc.title.seriesLe storie di Jatakaen_US
dc.title.setDh27Ien_US
dc.time.yr2002


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