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dc.contributor.authorLiao, Te-chenen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaṅghasenaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T20:10:30Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T20:10:30Z
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.other7557 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/82822
dc.description.abstractHere is a paperback version of 98 Buddhist fables. The book is apparently privately published by the translator. I read the first eleven. They seem to me to be closest to the pious anecdotes we read in hagiographical Christian literature like Rodriguez' The Practice of Perfection and Christian Virtues. They tend to show the folly of mistakes in early spirituality. Typical failures are to do a little something, to find it good, and then to overdo it. Alternatively, one fails and then tries to cover the failure and so compounds the problem. The frequent negative conclusion is that one is laughed at, or as one typo has it, laughted at (2). There are several such typos on the early pages I read. Let me report on three of these first fables. The first fable features a man who finds a little salt helping the flavor of his food. He then eats a great deal of salt on an empty stomach. So some monks find a little fasting good and then overdo their fasting. Fable 9 finds a man praising his father for giving up sexual desires completely from his earliest youth; he is laughed at when people ask how he came to be conceived. Fable 11 presents a Brahman who predicts that his son will die in a week. To save his reputation for accurate predictions, he kills his son and people come to respect him as a prophet. The introduction claims that Aesop's fables teach moral principles, while Sakyamuni's fables illustrate a religious precept to reflect the nature of human being. These latter are thus in this opinion strictly a religious literature. After an epilogue and a list of errata, apparently all the fables are told in Chinese.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityTranslated and annotated by Tetcheng Liaoen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherApparently privately publisheden_US
dc.publisherR. Liaoen_US
dc.subject.lccBQ5780.S37 1981en_US
dc.titleSakyamuni's One Hundred Fablesen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.locationTaipeien_US
dc.publisher.location[New York, N.Y.en_US
dc.description.noteLanguage note: Bilingual: English/Chineseen_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991000871629702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationJanet VanPatten, Fallbrook, CA, through eBayen_US
dc.cost.usCost: $4.99en_US
dc.date.acquired2011-12en_US
dc.date.printed1981en_US
dc.description.note2Original language: sanen_US
dc.printer.locationTaiwanen_US
dc.subject.local1Sakyamuni Buddhaen_US
dc.subject.local4Title Page Scanneden_US
dc.time.yr1981


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